Google’s Think Quarterly: The Church of London

Curator: Kristy Tillman
date: September 7, 2011
Categories: Book Design, Corporate Communications Design, Editorial Design
Tags:
From Youtube
Issue 1: The Data Issue

Think Quarterly is a full-length quarterly publication issued by Google and designed by the good people over at The Church of London

Think Quarterly, based in the UK,  features thought pieces from Google insiders and thought leaders on business and technology. Google describes it as a “looking glass into industry trends and insights” with a mission to engage the industry in conversation about the digital world and its future and to inspire new ways to approach business. 


As a designer, I simply call it beautiful. The first noticeable thing about Think Quarterly is how “unGooglelike” it looks, however, it its very Googleish in its innovative and experimental sensibilities. The first issue features a pop-up map spread and the second issue features a cover that comes with cling-ons so that each one is customizable. 


When the first issue was tweeted by @ThinkQuarterly it was an instant viral success, and the second issue, The Innovation Issue, was met with an equal amount of fanfare. 


Photo: The Church of London’s Flickr
Cover of Issue 2: The Innovation Issue

Photo: The Church of London’s Flickr
Cover of Issue 2

Spreads from Issue 2

It should be noted that the publication is originally done in a limited print run and sent to Google’s business partners. The web version is for the rest of us.
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1298970210 Meghan Copas

    This is really awesome! I would love to get my hands on this! It brings a whole new meaning to interactive books…speaking of interactive books check this out http://www.ted.com/talks/mike_matas.html
    not a pop-up book, but still pretty sweet.

  • http://kaitlinpowell.com Kaitlin

    Very beautiful. Though I wonder how useful the pop-up spread is. I can imagine getting frustrated trying to move aside all those tabs to see what’s on the tan behind. Though this might be so amazing that usability isn’t really a question.

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