Why No Instagrams Allowed Made "This Is Competition" by Tino Sehgal the Best Thing at Art Basel

Curator: Alex Mustonen
date: July 25, 2014
Categories: Experience Design
Tags: architecture, art, Basel, Herzog & de Meuron, Tino Sehgal
The best thing at Art Basel this June was an empty room containing a piece by Tino Sehgal called "This Is Competition." Two gallerists representing Sehgal stand and introduce themselves as well as the work, which involves discussing, re-enacting and ostensibly selling past works by the artist. 

The brilliant and entrancing aspect of the performance is that the gallerists speak by saying single, alternating words with each other in an ongoing, improvised speech that's also a choreographed, cooperative monologue and a lilting, competitive dialogue. 

Sehgal's work is immaterial and impressively undocumented. This piece and his portrait are represented only as empty grey boxes without descriptions in the official materials for the exhibition. The very fact that "This Is Competition" can't be photographed and shared via Instagram made it an indelibly memorable moment.

The empty room in question was one of 14 in the "14 Rooms" exhibition curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Klaus Biesenbach, which was a powerful experience. The show's success was in part determined by the architectural environment designed by Herzog & de Meuron. A freestanding box within Hall 3 of Messe Basel, the interior contained a massive corridor with mirrored walls at either end. Along each side of the corridor were seven mirrored doors, each with a unique, sculptural wood handle. Only by opening the door and entering the room would you discover what was occurring within--an experience a little like playing "Let's Make A Deal" in a hall of mirrors.
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Clock Clock by Humans Since 1982 for Victor Hunt

Curator: Alex Mustonen
date: July 23, 2014
Categories: Experience Design, Product Design
Tags: clock, product design, video

The clock clock white by humans since 1982 from Humans since 1982 on Vimeo.

Humans Since 1982 and Victor Hunt killed it on this one. You really have to see Clock Clock in person to fully understand and appreciate how mesmerizing it is. I love that it's driven by relatively advanced technology, but it's experienced in a very direct way through a well-designed, physical object. 

This is at the top of my list of works that I would love to have in my house, but unfortunately won't be able to afford anytime soon.
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Why Public School's Fall/Winter 2014 Collection is Just. So. Good.

Curator: Alex Mustonen
date: July 22, 2014
Categories: Experience Design
Tags: Fashion
The experience of seeing Public School's Winter 2014 show in New York this past February was a little unreal. The excitement in the room was electric, like watching your hometown team move up to the majors. 

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Patatap: a New Portable Animation and Sound App for Making Musical Graphics Anywhere

Curator: Leta Sobierajski
date: July 11, 2014
Categories: Design in Music, Entertainment Design, Experience Design
Tags: App, Design, mobile, music, user experience
Patatap is a portable animation and sound kit created by Jono Brandel and Lullatone. The concept is incredibly simple: press a key on your keyboard, and a colorful animation appears on your screen. There are different color palettes, each with their own unique set of sounds, that resemble a visual drum pad with versatile melodies and colorful geometric graphics. Even better, Patatapis now an iOS app, so you can create music even if you aren’t at your computer.

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Fuse: Skout

Curator: Katie Dill
date: June 27, 2014
Categories: Experience Design
Tags: App, Digital Design, ux
Despite all of the other chat apps out there, this is my favorite at the moment. It’s not Yo, it’s not Slingshot, it's not SnapChat—it’s Fuse! Fuse uses the contact list on your phone and it lets you make groups where you can share posts and comments. The magic is that you can give every post a “fuse”, a timer of ten, five or three mins. Once the timer ends, the image disappears forever. It creates a playful sense of urgency, delight and mystery.
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