Sexy Fingers: CRCR (NSFW, or is it?)

Curator: Jesse Reed
date: November 16, 2011
Categories: Experience Design, Illustration, Promotional Design & Advertising
Tags: campaign, interactive, sexy fingers, Web
Promotional video demonstrating the functionality of the website, and if you make it to the end, the message of the campaign.

AIDES, the leading HIV/AIDS awareness group in France, has commissioned an interactive website/campaign from the French studio CRCR. The campaign, appropriately titled Sexy Fingers, uses illustration and savvy interactive design to raise awareness of the HIV-testing method of pricking your finger for a single drop of blood. 

The European acceptance for showing nudity and provocative imagery in public advertising is nothing new. Why Americans become so uncomfortable with exposed human flesh is still a debatable topic, but we’ll step around that for now. The Sexy Fingers website is a musical playground of genitals, condoms, adult toys and breasts with legs, to name a few. A looping techno track plays as you navigate through various windows of mini-experiences, each with a different sample that you can play to accompany the beat. “Swing the Tit,” “Pull the Piercing,” it’s all there. Unfortunately, there’s no way (at least that I can see) to record what you’re genius mixing skills have come up with—but it’s entertaining nonetheless.

Now, what do these bouncing butts have to do with HIV? Not all that much. The illustrations are satirical and comedic, animated with a style that reminds me of Push Pin Studio meets spending a day at a Louise Bourgeois exhibit—what could be better? The scandalous and obscure nature of these “games” in a way distracts you from the fact that the website is essentially asking you to go get tested for HIV. After a few minutes of playing and feeling a little naughty, you suddenly remember that it’s ok to be doing this at your day job—because it’s for a good cause!

Custom logotype

Website landing page

“Pluck the G-String”

“Boob Clap”

“Butt Beat”

“Play Xilo-Balls”

“Play the Rubberband”

In all seriousness, yes, I agree a 10-year-old should not be looking at this website. But I do think that the intelligent design of the campaign and the lack of “maturity” are what make it a great success. You’re not beaten over the head with death rates, statistics or the epidemic still happening in many parts of the world—it’s a positive way of reminding people that this is still an issue and you should consider the risks. Is it timeless? No. Is it effective? Yes. 
  • ar

    The website doesn’t work. Everything stops after the first frame.

  • http://twitter.com/bluebergitt Sonjia Erickson

    Wha?

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